ECE Grad Brian Fox


BrianFox
ECE

 

ECE Grad Brian Fox
Not many students can say they had to wait for their research to come back from space before they could collect their doctorate degrees.

Not many students can say they had to wait for their research to come back from space before they could collect their doctorate degrees. And not many can say that along the way they earned the top award in their professional community.

Meet UA’s Brian Fox.

Most graduate students finish up in four or five years. Electrical and computer engineering graduate student Brian Fox has labored the better part of the last seven years, and waited. He saw his optical fibers launched into space aboard space shuttle Atlantis three years ago.

Then he waited in the wings 18 long months -- launch delay after launch delay -- to see how the radiation-hardened fibers had fared in the harsh space environment on the Materials International Space Station Experiment-7, or MISSE-7. Finally, in May 2011, the test fibers arrived back aboard space shuttle Endeavour on its final mission, commanded by Capt. Mark Kelly (husband of former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords).

“MISSE is one of those rare opportunities that only come around once or twice in a lifetime,” said Fox. “How many people get to send their research into space?”


Calling UA Engineering Alumni!

Where has life taken you since graduation? We’d like to know and so would your former engineering classmates.
Please email us and include the following information:
• Name and year you graduated
Major and degree (BS, MS, PhD, etc.)
Details of your activities
Don’t forget to include a digital picture of your family, latest project at work, or that boat or hot rod you just finished building in your garage. Vacation photos are great, too. We’ll publish your news and photos online and in the next print edition.
Please send your e-mail to pnb@email.arizona.edu

 


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